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Ballerinas standing on window sill in rehearsal room at George Balanchine’s School of American Ballet.
Alfred Eisenstaedt via Time & Life

Ballerinas standing on window sill in rehearsal room at George Balanchine’s School of American Ballet.

Alfred Eisenstaedt via Time & Life

— 2 days ago
#photography  #alfred eisenstaedt 

Zebrafish embryo - The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a tropical freshwater fish originating from eastern Asia and is a member of the minnow family. The zebrafish embryo has gained ground as a disease model, an assay system for drug screening and is used in cancer research.
[…] embryos develop quickly, from a single cell in a fertilized egg to something that resembles a tiny fish in 24 hours.

Annie Cavanah via Wellcome Image

Zebrafish embryo - The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a tropical freshwater fish originating from eastern Asia and is a member of the minnow family. The zebrafish embryo has gained ground as a disease model, an assay system for drug screening and is used in cancer research.

[…] embryos develop quickly, from a single cell in a fertilized egg to something that resembles a tiny fish in 24 hours.

Annie Cavanah via Wellcome Image

— 2 days ago with 1 note
#photography  #science  #biology 
Gold Eames fibreglass shell rocking chair.
Via Okay Art. [iainclaridge.co.uk]

Gold Eames fibreglass shell rocking chair.

Via Okay Art. [iainclaridge.co.uk]

— 1 week ago with 2 notes
#chair  #design  #eames  #eames chair 
What was it like to discover an ancient Egyptian tomb?

If the breathless records from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are to be believed, it was an experience almost too marvelous to be grasped. Having cleared a portal back through the centuries, the dirt-caked explorer stepped through it, and there, amid the coded relics, found himself face-to-face with an eerily recognizable predecessor from distant antiquity—a mute figure, surprising in its completeness, long dead and yet in the immediacy and strangeness of the encounter, somehow very much alive.

Tunneling into ancient tombs was laborious—they had been designed to foil grave robbers, after all, and the intervening millennia had filled them with rocky debris. Arrival in the burial chamber was often disorienting. In the poor light, explorers momentarily mistook exquisitely mummified domestic animals for live ones. They found stacks of hard goods in the sarcophagi, but also dried flowers and the leavings of a last meal, as though only a few weeks or months had passed since the long-distant funerary rites. Arthur Weigall, an Egyptologist of the period who wrote eloquently about such moments, compared them to walking through a tear in the curtain of time.

Even more striking, almost magical, was the quickness with which that curtain repaired itself. Upon discovery, items in the tombs started visibly to decay. The sudden change in temperature and atmosphere made vivid colors fade and carved outlines all but disappear. A scholar assigned to copy hieroglyphs inside King Tut’s tomb when it was discovered in 1922 records that he worked to the sound of ancient wood creaking and snapping as the new air flowed in.

Of course, many items of immeasurable scholarly, artistic, and commercial value did emerge from these once-sacred spaces, and in good condition. That value has made them the objects of all sorts of disputes and passions, and there’s no shortage of either in the story of Theodore Davis, the American tycoon who played a central role in the development of Egyptology.

For more than a decade, beginning with his uncovering of the resting place of Yuya and Thuyu—parents of the glamorous Queen Tiye—in 1905, Davis was the world’s best-known opener of tombs. He made the Valley of the Kings his personal sandlot, uncovering eighteen sarcophagi between 1902 and 1914 and paying for the clearing of a dozen more. He was assumed to have exhausted the valley by the time he died, in 1915. But then Howard Carter and George Herbert, Earl of Carnarvon, unearthed the perfectly intact resting place of King Tut, the likes of which the world had never seen before.

In a single stroke, Davis and his legacy were all but buried.

In King Tut’s Shadow—Vol. 2, No. 1—The Appendix

— 2 weeks ago
#ancient egypt  #tomb  #archeology 
'Well Spring' carafe by painter and writer Richard Redgrave (1804-1888), later Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures, was one of the designs made for Felix Summerly’s Art Manufactures. It is an example of early Victorian design especially promoted by Henry Cole (1808-1882), in which the decoration reflects the function of the object.
From the Collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum

'Well Spring' carafe by painter and writer Richard Redgrave (1804-1888), later Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures, was one of the designs made for Felix Summerly’s Art Manufactures. It is an example of early Victorian design especially promoted by Henry Cole (1808-1882), in which the decoration reflects the function of the object.

From the Collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum

— 3 weeks ago
#art  #painting  #vase  #glass vase  #victorian 

Architecture and engineering firm Samoo recently unveiled its winning designs for the project, the National Research Center for Endangered Species, to be built [in South Korea].

These closed-off ecosystems will be used to breed and raise endangered birds before releasing them back into the wild. The domes’ looming height is apparently a necessity to allow the birds to adapt. Another group of buildings will reportedly focus on breeding and studying other endangered species, including certain fish, frogs, tortoises, foxes, and deer.

via The Verge and Fast Co.

— 1 month ago
#biodome  #Architecture  #ecology  #nature 
The ancient tradition of honey hunting in Nepal
"Twice each year, the Gurung tribespeople of Central Nepal risk their lives collecting wild honey from the world’s largest hives high up on Himalayan cliffs. Travel photographer Andrew Newey recently spent two weeks capturing this ancient but dying art."
via 5 Intriguing Things newsletter by Alexis Madrigal

The ancient tradition of honey hunting in Nepal

"Twice each year, the Gurung tribespeople of Central Nepal risk their lives collecting wild honey from the world’s largest hives high up on Himalayan cliffs. Travel photographer Andrew Newey recently spent two weeks capturing this ancient but dying art."

via 5 Intriguing Things newsletter by Alexis Madrigal

— 1 month ago
#landscape  #honey  #nepal  #nature  #photography 
Life is stranger than fiction

“Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable.”

― Arthur Conan DoyleThe Complete Adventures of Sherlock Holmes [via goodreads.com]

— 1 month ago
#sherlock holmes  #arthur conan doyle  #literature 
Fred Guardineer Action Comics #15 Superman Cover Original Art (DC, 1939). Offered here is the original art for only the fifth Superman cover appearance ever, as the Man of Tomorrow rushes to the aid of a distressed U.S. submarine. It’s easily the earliest Superman cover art known to exist and quite possibly the earliest Superman art in existence.

Fred Guardineer Action Comics #15 Superman Cover Original Art (DC, 1939). Offered here is the original art for only the fifth Superman cover appearance ever, as the Man of Tomorrow rushes to the aid of a distressed U.S. submarine. It’s easily the earliest Superman cover art known to exist and quite possibly the earliest Superman art in existence.

— 1 month ago
#comics  #superman  #actioncomics